We exist to improve the lives
of everyone affected by epilepsy

Epilepsy Action’s vision and goals

A new future – our plans for 2012-2016

Approved by the Council of Management on 4 October 2011

We exist to improve the lives of everyone affected by epilepsy.

To do this we must ensure that all people with epilepsy…
have specialist health care and treatment for their condition
and
can lead their lives free of stigma, prejudice and discrimination. 

To make this happen…

  • We will improve the quality of health care services for people with epilepsy and make these more available.
  • We will change public attitudes towards epilepsy.
  • We will support people to be influential in the management of their epilepsy.
  • We will be a diverse, representative and effective organisation.

We will do this by…

We are Epilepsy Action…

We care about people with epilepsy and their families. We listen to them, we respond to their needs, we reflect their ambitions and we understand their lives. We never forget that epilepsy is about people.

We represent by providing identity, unity and a voice for people with epilepsy, their families and anyone else with an interest in the condition.

We lead by being creative and innovative in our thinking and decisive in our actions.

We inspire by being positive about epilepsy; by being courageous in what we do and confident in the way we do it.

We organise resources by raising money, encouraging and supporting volunteers and by working with others who share our goals.

We work locally where people with epilepsy live and nationally across all countries of the United Kingdom.

There are at least 600,000 people living with a diagnosis of epilepsy in the United Kingdom.

  • We know that the challenges we have set ourselves for the future are ambitious.
  • We know that they will not happen easily or quickly.
  • We know that with everyone working together we can achieve our goals and we can improve the lives of people with epilepsy.

Within ten years we aim to see…

  • Fewer epilepsy related deaths.
  • Rates of epilepsy misdiagnosis going down.
  • More people achieving seizure control.
  • Fewer people having harmful side effects from anti-epileptic drugs.
  • People with epilepsy informed about their condition and their views influencing their care and treatment.
  • A reduction in the indicators of stigma.
  • Evidence of positive changes in public attitudes.
  • Evidence of greater social inclusion of people with epilepsy.

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