We fight to improve the lives
of everyone affected by epilepsy

Sophie Walsh

I was diagnosed with epilepsy when I was 4 years old. However when I was a baby there was several incidents where my mum and dad suspected I had epilepsy. When I was first diagnosed I could have up to 8 and 10 complex partial seizures a day. I found my time at school really challenging due to epilepsy which lead to me missing out on important classes leading up to exams and stress being one of the triggers for my seizures I found this really hard to cope with which was a really difficult time for me. Now most of my seizures are unpredictable and happen during the night and can have from 4 to 20 a day. I try to live a normal life as possible such as going to concerts, going drinking and clubbing with my friends but not being able to drive is one thing I’ve found really difficult and seeing all my friends pass their driving test has been really hard to watch, but I hope one day this is something I’ll be able to achieve. When I was younger my mum and dad said I coped really well but now, 19 years old as an adult I find it more difficult because you tend to focus on the negatives rather than the positives. As an Adult you know that there’s a possibility you might never be seizure free and they might never be under control. Epilepsy can be a very lonely place. You can be surrounded by loved ones who love and care for you but you yourself know they will just never understand what it’s really like to live with this illness that follows you around every day. Today, I’m in the process of getting tests to see if I’d be eligible for brain surgery, but if not with my friends & families support I’ll be able to accept that epilepsy is something that I may have to live with for the rest of my life. I’m not going to lie I still have bad days, but who doesn’t? It’s not been an easy journey but I believe it’s made me the person I am today. I guess what I’m trying to say is, don’t let epilepsy define who you are.

Sophie Walsh
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