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Stories about medicines

Epilepsy medicines not part of government plans to let pharmacists ration medicines in case of no-deal Brexit

8 Jan 2019

The government has said epilepsy medicines will not be included in plans to allow pharmacists to ration medicines in the case of a no-deal Brexit, the Sunday Times has reported.

In December, the government set out plans to avoid shortages of medicines, which it called a “serious shortage protocol”. This would be in the event that no Brexit deal is made and the UK leaves the EU without one.

Brexit Health Alliance urges Brexit negotiators to put patients first

9 Apr 2018

The Brexit Health Alliance has warned that people may face long delays in getting new medicines as a result of Brexit. Research cooperation and access to clinical trials may also be affected, the organisation said.

The alliance is urging Brexit negotiators to prioritise patients and public health during the second phase of negotiations.

Lacosamide epilepsy medicine approved for use in children over 4 years old with focal-onset seizures

29 Sep 2017

Pharmaceutical company UCB’s lacosamide epilepsy medicine, known as VIMPAT, has been approved by the European Commission for use in children over 4 years old in Europe.

The lacosamide medicine was approved in September for use on its own or alongside other medicines to treat focal-onset seizures. It was previously approved for use in teenagers over 16 years old and adults in Europe.

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