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Stories about pregnancy

New study links sodium valproate to autism

26 Apr 2013

There has been a scientific study carried out in Denmark. It looked at 650,000 children born between 1996 and 2006. The study found that the children’s risk of having any type of autism spectrum disorder was increased, when certain mothers took valproate during pregnancy.

There is already a known risk with taking sodium valproate during pregnancy. It increases the risk of children being born with birth defects and thinking problems. The new research also shows that valproate significantly increases the risk of having a child with autism or an autism spectrum disorder.

Epilim and pregnancy

5 Feb 2013

Pregnant stomach next to medicine bottlesTwo recent studies have explored the effect of sodium valproate (Epilim) on pregnancy.

Research in the UK suggests that children born to mothers who took an epilepsy medicine during pregnancy are six to ten times more likely to have a neurodevelopmental disorder. The research found that children born to mothers who took sodium valproate (Epilim) were more likely to develop autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or dyspraxia.

Pregnant women more likely to stop taking medication

28 Jan 2013

pregnant womanA UK study has found that pregnant women with epilepsy are more likely to stop taking their epilepsy medicines, compared to women who are not pregnant.

Researchers, led by Shuk-Li Man, analysed prescribing trends for anti-epileptic drugs from 1994 to 2009. The results show that prescribing of newer medicines has steadily increased. Lamotrigine has been the most popular medicine prescribed in pregnancy since 2004. However, the use of carbamazepine and sodium valporate has decreased.

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