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Stories about seizures

New device claims to be able to predict seizures

1 May 2013

brainA research study says that seizures can be predicted with a new device. The device is put in the brain, and is able to give a warning that a seizure is coming. The study was only small, but could prove to be an exciting development for people with epilepsy.

The device, once inside the brain, predicted seizures in some adults who have epilepsy that can’t be controlled by anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). “Knowing when a seizure might happen could dramatically improve the quality of life and independence of people with epilepsy,” said lead author Mark Cook from the University of Melbourne in Australia.

Japanese tsunami increased seizures?

31 Jan 2013

A small study in Japan has found that the number of seizure patients increased in the weeks following the tsunami in March 2011.

The report is published in Epilepsia and refers to Kesennuma City, a small fishing community in north-eastern Japan. It found that 13 people were admitted with seizures in the eight weeks after the natural disaster. Only one person had been admitted in the eight weeks before.

‘Calm down’ genes treat epilepsy in rats

20 Nov 2012

Scientists working at University College London have cured epilepsy in rats by adding a special ‘calm down’ gene. The gene stops groups of neurons (brain cells) becoming too excited – and prevents seizures.

According to a report on BBC News, the researchers have developed two ways of manipulating the behavior of individual cells inside the brain in order to prevent seizures.

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