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Stories about surgery

New studies show surgery 'less risky'

17 Jul 2013

According to reports at a recent epilepsy conference, a new surgical technique could ‘revolutionise’ surgery to cure epilepsy. Stereotactic laser ablation of the hippocampus (SLAH) may result in increased seizure freedom. The surgery is also less risky, new studies show.

“I believe this technique can revolutionise how we approach brain surgery, as long as it continues to prove safe and shows adequate efficacy for seizure control,” study investigator, Daniel Drane, PhD, told Medscape Medical News at the 30th International Epilepsy Conference in Montreal, Canada.

New process improves surgery planning

10 Apr 2013

A new report published in the March issue of Neurosurgery has shed light onto Stereo-electroencephalography (SEEG).

SEEG is a process that aims to improve surgical panning and surgery for patients with intractable epilepsy. It uses 3D imaging of the brain alongside placing electrodes in the area of the brain in which seizures originate. This results in highly detailed data of the brain to increase accuracy when planning brain surgery.

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