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  • This article was published in August 2013. The information may be out of date. Please check our epilepsy information or our site A-Z.
  • This article was published in July 2013. The information may be out of date. Please check our epilepsy information or our site A-Z.
  • This article was published in May 2013. The information may be out of date. Please check our epilepsy information or our site A-Z.

Stories about research

New genes linked to epilepsy by study

14 Aug 2013

Huge studies into the genetic causes of epilepsy have started to produce results. The US-led studies, called EPGP and Epi4K, involve 150 scientists working in 40 institutions over three continents. The studies have discovered 25 new mutations on nine key genes that are behind some severe childhood epilepsies. Among those were two genes never before linked to this kind of epilepsy. Scientists hope that the studies will lead to a way to test newborn babies for the risk of developing epilepsy – and help develop precise drug treatments.

Study hopes to identify those likely to develop epilepsy after a stroke

19 Jul 2013

After a stroke, statistics show that some people are more likely to develop epilepsy, while some are not. It is not fully understood why this is. Now a new study hopes to help with this. This means that people who have had a stroke could receive early epilepsy treatment if necessary.

Every year around 150,000 people in the UK have a stroke. It is the most common cause of epilepsy in people over the age of 60. A stroke can cause brain injury because of bleeding or blockage of the blood supply. When a stroke happens, it can cause a seizure at the site of the damage. Seizures can also develop later.

New studies show surgery 'less risky'

17 Jul 2013

According to reports at a recent epilepsy conference, a new surgical technique could ‘revolutionise’ surgery to cure epilepsy. Stereotactic laser ablation of the hippocampus (SLAH) may result in increased seizure freedom. The surgery is also less risky, new studies show.

“I believe this technique can revolutionise how we approach brain surgery, as long as it continues to prove safe and shows adequate efficacy for seizure control,” study investigator, Daniel Drane, PhD, told Medscape Medical News at the 30th International Epilepsy Conference in Montreal, Canada.

Diagnosis by computer?

23 May 2013

Imagine all the world’s data on epilepsy. Imagine all the world’s scientific literature on epilepsy. Then imagine it crunched by a super computer. This computer has a brain better than the most intelligent human being. Then imagine that resulting data being used by your doctor the next time you talk to them about your epilepsy. This has just come a step closer to real life.

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