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Reporting seizures to the driving agency

These pages are about driving laws in the UK. If you are looking for information about driving laws in another country, please contact your local epilepsy organisation.

I have had a seizure. Do I need to stop driving and inform the driving agency?

If you have a suspected seizure at any time, the law says you must stop driving and inform the driving agency. There are two exceptions to this. You are allowed to continue driving if:

  • You already hold a driving licence that has been issued on the understanding that you have seizures while asleep, and the seizure you have just had was when you were asleep OR
  • You already hold a driving licence that has been issued on the understanding that you have only ever had seizures that don’t affect your consciousness, and the seizure you have just had didn’t affect your consciousness

Why should I stop driving and inform the driving agency that I have had a seizure?

It is your responsibility
It’s important to stop driving when you’ve had a seizure because:

  • A seizure could affect your ability to drive safely
  • If you continue driving, you will be breaking the law and could face prosecution
  • Your car insurance will not cover you

It is your responsibility to inform the driving agency. If you don’t do this and carry on driving, anyone could report this to them. Your doctor may also inform the driving agency if you carry on driving when you shouldn’t. Although doctors have a duty to protect their patients’ confidentiality, over and above this, they have a duty of care to protect the public.

Particular information on reporting seizures to DVLA in Great Britain

How do I inform the driving agency that I have had a seizure and I have to stop driving?

There are two forms you need to complete:

  • You can download a medical conditions form FEP1. Or you can write to, or telephone, the driving agency, telling them the date of your most recent seizure
  • You will also need to complete the declaration of voluntary surrender form. Return this with your licence. It’s a good idea to either take a photocopy of your driving licence, or to make a note of your driving licence number. This information will be helpful if you reapply for your driving licence at a later date

Advantages of sending your licence back voluntarily

There are two advantages of sending your driving licence back voluntarily. The first advantage is that you can start the process of reapplying for your driving licence 10 months after your last seizure. The other advantage is that you may be able to start driving again after 12 months even if you haven’t got your driving licence back yet. This would be possible if:

  • The driving agency has received your application
  • You meet the epilepsy and driving laws
  • There are no other medical or legal reasons why you should not be driving

Full Information about this is available in the leaflet INF188/6 - Can I drive while my application is with DVLA?

DVLA website: gov.uk/government/publications

If you decide not to send your licence back voluntarily

If you do not send your driving licence back voluntarily it will get revoked by the driving agency. There are particular disadvantages to this. If your driving licence was revoked by the driving agency, they can only start processing your application 12 months after your last seizure. What's more, you can only start driving again when you meet the epilepsy driving regulations and you have your new driving licence.

If the driving agency learns that you need to stop driving they will send you a form to complete and ask your permission to contact your doctor for a medical report. In some cases they may ask for you to be examined by one of their nominated medical practitioners. The driving agency will then write and tell you whether or not your driving licence is formally withdrawn and, if so, for how long. They will also ask you to send your driving licence back. This is known as ‘revoking’ your driving licence.

Particular information on reporting seizures to DVA in Northern Ireland

How do I inform the driving agency that I have had a seizure?

If you currently have any of the medical conditions or disabilities listed on the DVA website, you will need to tell DVA about these. To do this you will need to complete a DL1 application form. Then forward it to DVA who will send you the appropriate medical questionnaires to complete. DL1 forms are available from main Post Office branches. MOT test centres and  DVA.

If you receive a medical questionnaire as a result of telling DVA of a condition, you will need to arrange for your doctor to complete the form. Your questionnaire will include a consent form that must be signed. This allows DVA to make medical enquiries into your fitness to drive.

With your medical questionnaire you will also receive a GP claim form. If your GP wants paying for the completion of the medical questionnaire, they have to complete the claim form and return it to DVA.

DVA will pay the appropriate fee to your GP or specialist for the completion of your medical form on the first occasion only. Payment for duplicates will be your responsibility.

If you would like to see this information with references, visit the Advice and Information references section of our website. If you are unable to access the internet, please contact our Epilepsy Action freephone Helpline on 0808 800 5050.

Code: 
B005.04

This information was written by Epilepsy Action’s advice and information team, with guidance and input from people living with epilepsy and experts at DVLA.

Epilepsy Action would like to thank Edward Foxell at DVLA for his contribution to this information. 

The DVLA has no conflict of interest.

This information has been produced under the terms of The Information Standard.

  • Updated April 2015
    To be reviewed April 2018

Comments: read the 38 comments or add yours

Comments

I had a fit over a year ago and another just over 6 months ago, I haven't yet applied for a provisional licence. I had tests done to which the doctors couldn't find anything wrong and thought they were isolated events and nothing more was done. They told me I could start to learn to drive 6 months after my last fit, which it now is. Do I still need to declare it when applying for my provisional licence? I am not planning to start learning to drive, I am just using it for ID as my 18th is coming up.

Submitted by Jessica on

Hi Jessica

Yes you will need to declare this to the DVLA. And I’m not sure they will agree with your doctor about two seizures six months apart being isolated.

They are more likely to say you have to be seizure free for a year before applying for your provisional licence.

ID can be a problem though. Some people find the Citizen Card can be useful.

Hope that helps.

Cherry
Epilepsy Action Advice and Information Team

Submitted by Cherry, Epileps... on

Hi, my daughter who has a provisional licence and had been having driving lessons, suffered a fit two months ago, she subsequently had another fit 2 hours later. CT and MRI scan clear, saw Neurologist yesterday who confirmed it was a provoked seizure, as leading up to the fit she had a nasty viral infection and migraine. On recommendation from the Neurologist she has been given levetiracetam 250mg to take every evening for the next three years as due to her age and being a migraine sufferer this should lessen the chance of it happening again. He also said she could resume her driving lessons 6 months from the date of seizure. Her driving school informed us we didn't need to inform DVLA and she could just resume her lessons end of July. On reading advice from the DVLA website it contradicts what they are telling us. Can you please clarify, should she be surrendering her licence before reapplying for it 2 months before she's allowed to drive again? Thank you.

Submitted by Marie on

Hi Marie

You were right to question that advice. Even if the doctor defines the seizures as provoked, I am afraid it is unlikely the DVLA will. Here is our information on driving and provoked seizures: https://www.epilepsy.org.uk/info/driving/driving-licences-group-1-rules#rule6

They are much more likely to say that your daughter will need to be 12 months seizure free before she can reapply for her licence.

I would strongly recommend her returning her licence now. Partly because this instruction is written on your licence or provisional licence as what you should do if you have any change in your medical circumstance. And partly because if she hands her licence in voluntarily, then she can start the process of reapplying for it 10 months after being seizure free. https://www.epilepsy.org.uk/info/driving/applying-for-your-licence#first

 

I hope this helps.

Cherry

Advice and Information Team

Submitted by Cherry Epilepsy... on

I my question is I was diagnosed with sleep epilepsy and have been fit free for 3 years, but 2 weeks ago due to a bad nights sleep and sleep deprivation i had a seziure at about 6:20 am. Do I now have to stop driving again for 1 year or should I wait till I see the consultant at the end of April. As I have stopped driving for now but it is a pain getting to my place of work due to my shift patterns and no one living near me to give me a lift. Any help would be appreciated

Thanks
Luke

Submitted by Luke on

Hi Luke,

There are two important questions to ask here:

Have you been given a driving licence on the understanding that you only have sleep seizures?

Were you asleep when you had your most recent seizure?

If the answer is yes to both you would still be allowed to drive. Even if a seizure happens during the day, if you were asleep at the time it still counts as a sleep seizure.

If the answer to either of those questions is no, then the law says you need to stop driving straight away and tell the DVLA. You would then need to be seizure free for a year before you can drive again. The DVLA rules for people who have sleep seizures are quite complicated, but you might find our driving information helps.

If the DVLA says you can’t drive, you may be entitled to a free bus pass or cheaper train travel. You may also be entitled to help from the Access to Work scheme.

I hope this information helps. If you want to talk through anything feel free to contact us again on the Epilepsy Helpline freephone 0808 800 5050. 

Grace
Epilepsy Action Advice and Information Team

Submitted by Grace@Epilepsy ... on

Hi I wonder if anyone can help. I collapsed and lost consciousness a few weeks ago and I am under investigation at the moment whether I had a seizure or not, the hospital has told me I need to tell the dvla. Do you think they will tell me I have to stop driving? And what do I do
Thankyou

Submitted by nicole on

Hi Nicole

If you have a loss of consciousness the law says you must stop driving straight away and tell the DVLA. To tell the DVLA you will need to complete a medical conditions form FEP1. If you are surrendering your licence you will also need to complete a declaration of voluntary surrender form. There are advantages to surrendering your licence voluntarily, as it means you may be able to start driving again once you meet the driving conditions without having to wait for your licence back. This would be possible if:

  • The driving agency has received your application
  • You meet the epilepsy and driving laws
  • There are no other medical or legal reasons why you should not be driving

If you don’t surrender your licence it is likely to be revoked by the DVLA. If they revoke your licence, they will only be able to start processing your application to re-apply for your licence 12 months after the date of your suspected seizure.

If after investigation the doctor decides it was an isolated loss of consciousness and is unlikely to happen again, you may be able to drive again after six months. The driving rules can be quite complex and this must be quite a lot to take in. If it would help to talk it through with anyone you can call the Epilepsy Action Helpline on 0808 800 5050.

I hope this helps.

Grace
Epilepsy Action Advice and Information Team

Submitted by Grace, Epilepsy... on

I had ( i am 45years old ) a stroke (blood clot) in May 2014 and in April 2015, I had a first seizure on my left side which is the stroke affected arm. I remained awake but tired. My arm was shaking but my hand starting tingling to start off with and was in pain on left side of body. It wasnt another stroke as MRI is ok, I have have been given 25mg which will rise to 100mg.lamotrigine . I have surrended my driving licence but unsure what happens next.

Submitted by Mr K Kelvin on

Hello Mr Kelvin
It sounds like this has been a tough year for you.

The DVLA should contact you in the near future confirming your voluntary surrender of your licence. This is often in the form of a letter. It may be worth you contacting them to confirm that they have received your licence a little while after you return it. By confirming their receipt, you may be able to move more smoothly through the re-application process in future.

Driving rules can be quite complicated, so if you would like to talk about any of this information in person please feel free to call our helpline team on 0808 800 5050.

Karen
Epilepsy Action Advice & Information Team

Submitted by Karen, Epilepsy... on

I am returning to UK after 35 years. I have an EU driver's license. Seizure free for 13 years. Taking Lamotrigine. Must my UK doctor report me to DVLC?

Submitted by Sonja on

Hi Sonja

Thank you for your question. We can’t give you a definite answer, as we have not come across this situation before. The DVLA should be able to advise you. They have a webpage on Driving in Great Britain on a non-GB licence.

But we can say that you do meet the epilepsy driving regulation to hold a UK driving licence.

Regards

Diane Wallace
Epilepsy Action Advice and Information Team

Submitted by Diane, Epilepsy... on

My girlfriend who is 69 just had a seizure for the first time in 22 years. Will she have to wait six months or a year before getting her licence back? She had two in a week 22 years ago ao she is disappointed that the medication failed her this time. Is she more or less liable to have another within the next ten years.

Submitted by Barry Lenton on

Hi, I hope I'm not getting ahead of myself but I'm having surgery to hopefully correct my epilepsy next week. If this is successful then in 12 months I should be able to re-apply for my driving licence after around 8 years. Can you tell me if I will have to retake my test or will it simply be a matter of re-applying for my licence providing I have been seizure free for 12 months following the surgery? Many thanks.

Submitted by Carl on

Hi Carl
Thank you for your question.

You will not have to take your driving test again. Although some people who haven’t driven for many years, may book some refresher lessons with a driving instructor.

Hope your surgery goes well.

Regards
Diane Wallace
Epilepsy Action Advice and Information Team

Submitted by 37204 on

Hi, Thanks for that. Fingers crossed the surgery is successful then! Carl.

Submitted by Carl on

Hello, for the last couple of months I have been having ' funny turns', lasting between 10-30 seconds where I am fully conscious and aware of what's happening. I feel I have glimpses into a 'parallel life', a bit like Deja vu. I saw a nurologist and he said he thinks it could 'seizures without alteration in consciousness', with no treatment (I have had an MRI scan but awaiting results) I have been advised to let the DVLA know. From reading info on your website I might be able to drive as I don't loose conciousness..... If this is the case what is the process for letting DVLA know? Will I need a gap from driving whilst it is sorted out?

Any advice welcomed! Thank you in advance

Submitted by sarah Clarke on

Hello Sarah
Thanks for your message. When you have any type of seizure you need to stop driving and let the DVLA know. You will need to stop driving while they make a decision. When you inform the DVLA, there are two forms you need to fill in. The first is the medical conditions form FEP1. On this form you will need to give a full description of what happens during your seizures. You will also need to complete the declaration of voluntary surrender form and return it with your licence. Once the DVLA has considered the information, they will let you know when you can start driving again. You will usually need to have had a 12 month pattern of seizures that don’t affect your consciousness.

I hope this helps. If you have any further questions please feel free to get in touch.

Best wishes
Grace
Epilepsy Action Advice and Information Team

Submitted by Grace, Epilepsy... on

Hi I know everything about the seizures and the only thing I am confused about is if I can sit in the car with a learner driver as my partner wants to carry on driving as we was doing it before I started having the seizures and now I don't know if I am allowed

Submitted by Nicola on

I did not notified DVLA about my seizures however I stopped driving because of as a father of family I decided that this is too dangerous. I did not drive often anyway. My wife was a driver however under my policy as a named driver. First at all. I did not notice DVLA about it because of driving license is the only document confirming my ID and address.
Now. I'm 16months seizures free. What shall I do ? Doctor advised me that I can reapply for license (where I never notified DVLA).
What shall I do ?

Also on the previous insurance policy my wife had an incident (non fault). Is that changing anything ?

Thanks, Mark

Submitted by Marc on

Hi Mark
That’s great that you have been seizure free for over a year and can now look at driving again.

You’ll need to write to the DVLA explaining the situation. They are usually more interested in whether you are driving legally now more than what you were doing in the past.

But your driving licence and car insurance stopped being valid when you had your first seizure. So you will need to contact the DVLA. This is because you will need a new licence based on the fact that you have been seizure free for at least 12 months.

I’m afraid I don’t know what impact your wife’s incident would have on your car insurance.

I hope that’s useful.

Cherry
Epilepsy Action Advice and Information Team

Submitted by 37204 on

Hi Mark,

I noticed your predicament. My sons had a similar scenario - fits in 2014 and have not driven since. They did not hand in their driving licensees. Both want to start driving again and we don't quite know what to do.

How did you resolve your issue and do you have any advice based on that experience?

Submitted by Steven Jones on

Hi Marc
Thank you for your post.

From experience, it’s generally not a problem that you hadn’t already notified the DVLA. In most cases, it’s the fact you haven’t driven and you are now updating your licence that counts. To get your information updated with the DVLA you will need to complete the medical conditions form FEP1. Or you can write to, or telephone, the driving agency. You will also need to complete the declaration of voluntary surrender . You will need to also return your driving licence. (It’s a good idea to either take a photocopy of your driving licence, or to make a note of your driving licence number.)

When the DVLA have the information they need, they will tell you when you can drive again. They will also send you a new driving licence.

Regards
Diane
Epilepsy Action Advice and Information Team

Submitted by Sacha on

I had a seizure 3 weeks ago whilst flying to barbados. I have never had a seizure before and as a nurse i have spoke to some doctors at work who say that it's quite common to have a seizure whilst flying due to pressure changes etc. My GP has referred me to a neurologist and told me to inform the dvla so how long would i not be able to drive for please.

Submitted by linda Harrison on

Hi Linda
The driving regulations can be confusing as there are different regulations for different situations.

When you can drive again will depend on the neurologist’s diagnosis. There are different regulations for a one off seizure, a provoked seizure or epilepsy.

If we can be of any more help, please feel free to contact us again. You can contact us directly, either by email helpline@epilepsy.org.uk or the Epilepsy Action Helpline freephone 0808 800 5050. Our helpline is open Monday to Friday, 8.30am until 5.30pm.

Regards
Diane
Epilepsy Action Advice and Information Team

Submitted by Diane, Epilepsy... on

My ex partner has just got his licence back after claiming he's had no seizures for a year. I have personally whitnessed him having seizures in the last year and am very worried for my child's and other peoples safety. I know he will take my child in the car even when I ask him not to. He has managed to lie to his doctor as his seizures were so often (sometimes six a night) he would ask that nobody ring an ambulance for him. How do I go about this without looking like just a spiteful ex girlfriend? My friends agree with me that it would be very irresponsible for me not to try and get this sorted. Thank you

Submitted by Lisa n on

Hello Lisa
This sounds like a difficult situation to find yourself in.

When someone contacts us to ask about driving we try to talk through the reasons why they need to stop driving and tell the DVLA. It is important for a person to stop driving when they have a seizure because:

  • A seizure could affect their ability to drive safely
  • If they continue to drive, they will be breaking the law and could face prosecution
  • Their car insurance will not cover them
  • Their licence will be invalid

If you haven’t already, you could make your ex-partner aware that if he doesn’t tell the DVLA they could fine him up to £1,000. He could also be prosecuted if he has an accident.

If this is not possible, and your ex-partner will still not stop driving, anyone can report their concerns over a person's fitness to drive to the DVLA. This could be yourself as a member of the public, or a professional. The details of the person who made the report are not passed on to the person.

Karen
Epilepsy Action Advice & Information Team

Submitted by Karen, Epilepsy... on

I have been having dizzy spells and memory loss over a five year period, been to neurology and Dr said he would prefer me to stop driving whilst they investigate what is wrong. I am not sure if I need to surrender my licence just yet or inform the dvla. I won't be driving at all till I know what is wrong but if it is not epilepsy it seems daft to surrender it just yet. What is best ?

Submitted by Andrew L on

Hi Andrew

To our understanding you can wait until after your investigations are completed and the doctor has a clear understanding of what is happening.

The main thing is you are following your doctor’s orders and not driving. Once the doctor said you couldn’t drive, your licence and insurance became invalid.

When the doctor makes a diagnosis, talk to them again about your driving. If it’s a condition that could affect your ability to drive safety, you must contact the DVLA.

Regards

Diane
Epilepsy Action advice and information team

Submitted by Diane@Epilepsy ... on

Thank you for the reply, I have stopped driving straight away, although the stress generated to try and get to work now (I work in a town miles from home) is going to be absolutely sky-high.
If diagnosed with petit mal which has been mentioned as a possible can it be controlled so I can drive again ? Sorry for daft questions but ceasing driving for good is pretty much a career ender for me.

Submitted by Andrew L on

Hi Andrew
There are different driving regulations for different seizure types.

If you have to stop driving due to epilepsy, your employer should look at any possible reasonable adjustments to help. For example, can you use taxis, other public transport, could they give you work that’s within easy reach, flexible working hours to help with your traveling to work, could you be office based (if there is a position or work available)?

You could also contact Access to work, to see if they can help in anyway. Access to Work might pay towards any added expenses in the workplace to meet your needs. You can get further information from your local Jobcentre Plus. Their telephone number will be in your Phone Book.

It must seem difficult when you have been used to having a car. To help whilst you can’t drive, if you are diagnosed with epilepsy you are entitled to a free bus pass as well as the Disabled Rail Card. I realise it doesn’t take away the difficulty of using public transport. Many people do find ways of getting around when they’ve looked at all their local options. I hope this applies to you.

I’d just like to add, that if you do get diagnosed with epilepsy there’s a good chance that your seizures can be controlled with the right treatment.

Regards
Diane
Epilepsy Action Advice and Information Team

Submitted by Diane, Epilepsy... on

My friend had a seizure due to an abscess behind his eye, he then had an operation to drain off the abscess, this was successful, does he need to surrender his licence he has not yet been advised not to drive by anyone from the hospital, the seizure was down to the abcess, if he informs the dvla how soon could he get his licence back, also should he wait for the gp to advise or just go ahead and surrender his licence ,he does not want to ut himself and others at risk so has stopped driving , when will the 10 month rule apply ? Is it from surrender date or seizure date.

Submitted by Billy on

Hi, I had 2 seizures around 12 & 14 years ago, had all the tests done & was told I don't have epilepsy. About 3 years ago I had another one after being badly injured (I think it was due to shock) but the doctor told me not to drive (which I didn't really care about at the time because I don't like driving & hadn't done any for years) as I've now had 3 seizures it counts as epilepsy. She gave me a referral to make an appointment with the specialist but I gave up trying to book it after a couple of months because I kept getting told there were no appointments available.

I never contacted DVLA to give up my license (I didn't realise I had to until I just read this site). I am moving abroad in a couple of weeks for a few months for work & I just found out I need to drive as there is no public transport, what are my options?

a) Talk to my DR & ask her if I can drive now. I see this as being a potential problem, she could say no or insist I see a specialist (something I don't have time for), or she could even report me to DVLA.

b) Don't say anything. I will be driving in a different country so who is going to know.

I think the seriousness of that last seizure was blown out of proportion & feel like I am perfectly fine to drive if I wasn't I wouldn't even consider doing it. My DR is not very good at listening though so I don't trust her opinion on it, I think she will err on the side of caution to cover herself.

What should I do?

Submitted by Anna on

Hi 

If you haven’t had a seizure for over 12 months then you do meet the epilepsy and driving laws.

 But your problem is that you don’t have a valid driving licence and your insurance won’t cover you. This is because if you have any type of change or loss of consciousness you need to contact DVLA.

When someone informs DVLA they have had seizures and they later apply for their licence back, they get a licence based on being 12 months seizure free. This is the type of licence you need now. 

In order for DVLA to be sure you meet the epilepsy and driving laws, they will need to investigate. So if you haven’t seen a specialist they will need to contact your family doctor. And if your family doctor referred you to a specialist and you didn’t go, DVLA may see that as a problem.

I understand this will not be the information you want to hear. And that it is likely to cause problems for you. But I do need to tell you what the law is.

I really hope you are able to resolve the situation in a way that is safe and manageable.

Cherry  

Epilepsy Action Advice and Information team

 

Submitted by Cherry, Epileps... on

Hi, my wife suffers from epilepsy but has been seizure free since Nov 2009 and been driving since 2011. Unfortunately last weekend on Sunday morning she suffered a seizure and initially we had no idea why, but discovered that on Saturday evening she forgot to take a dose of her usual medication (she takes 2 tablets twice a day). This is the first time that she has ever done this and couldn't believe that she'd forgotten but having two children under 2 and one only 5 months old it's perfectly understandable how this could happen. The problem we now face is whether she can drive or not. We visited our GP early this week and discussed the matter and she said she needed to check up on things and then get back to us with some advice, but yesterday she rang and the only advice she offered was that she didn't know what to do and my wife should contact the DVLA. My assumption would be that the DVLA would want a medical opinion as to whether my wife is fit to drive anyway so surely they would to contact the GP for their advice in these circumstances? My question is really this, what should we do next? Having a young family we are not willing to take any risks with her condition and she hasn't driven since in the absence of any advice but there is a simple explanation for this seizure and when taking the medication she is currently on, the epilepsy is under control so I would think she is fit to drive. Clearly there is the risk of her not being able to drive for 12 months which makes our lives a lot more difficult but I want to make sure that we follow the correct process whilst giving her the fairest chance of maintaining the opportunity to drive when we consider her condition to be no greater a risk than it has been for the previous 6 years and 8 months in which she has remained clear of seizures. I'd appreciate it is someone could offer me some advice on this.
Many thanks.

Submitted by Mike on

Hi Mike

It will be difficult, especially as you have a young family, but it’s important that your wife surrenders her licence to the DVLA. If she uses the DLA forms listed below she will get the opportunity to explain what has happened. The DVLA will look at her individual situation. There are two forms she needs to complete:

It’s possible she may not be able to drive for 12 months. But if she voluntary surrenders her licence that has advantages when it’s time to reapply for her licence. I’m sorry that this is not what you want to hear, but it is actually the law. Here is some information about concessionary travel fares.

If we can be of any more help, please feel free to contact us again, You can contact our helpline team directly either by email helpline@epilepsy.org.uk  or phone the Epilepsy Action Helpline freephone 0808 800 5050. Our helpline is open Monday to Friday, 8.30am until 5.30pm.

Regards

Diane

Epilepsy Action Helpline Team

Submitted by todd at Epileps... on

2 weeks ago while at work I had a suspected seizure. At 35 this is not something I have ever experienced before. Body went stiff, stopped breathing and heart also stopped fortunately I work in an environment where there are several first aid trained personnel about. I got taken off to hospital by ambulance where they took lots of blood tests and then left me sat there for 9 hours with not much information. Due to another medical condition I current take fairly high dosages of Tramadhol but other than acting as a pain killer do not have any effect on any other functions. At the time of the suspected seizure I had been going through a prolonged period of extreme stress both at work and home.
After the time I was sat at the hospital the doctor called me in and said my blood tests seemed fine and they were making me an appointment with a neurologist and advised me not to drive. I then had an appointment with my GP 2 days later who could not find any appointment made by the hospital so instead made an appointment which I'm still waiting for and haven't driven since.
My question is, will there be any scenario where I don't lose my driving license for a period other than this current wait for a neurologist?
As I work horrible hours and most nights finish between 5-6am, and often have cover at other venues my car is vital to my job.
Any advice you can offer would be greatly received

Kind Regards
Dave

Submitted by Dave on

Hello Dave

This sounds like a difficult situation to find yourself in. This must have been scary for you.  

It is possible for a person to have a single seizure in their lifetime, yet not have epilepsy. It is good to hear that your GP has referred you to a specialist doctor. The most important thing at the moment is to try to find a cause for what has happened. The specialist doctor may do some tests to give them useful information about what may have happened. We have more information about how epilepsy is diagnosed on our website.

The length of time a person must stop driving will depend on the cause of the seizure. For a person who is diagnosed with epilepsy, this is often 12 months, although there are different rules for different causes. The driving agency will ask both yourself and your doctor for more information about what happened. This will help them to make a decision about how long you should stop driving for.

You may find it helpful to tell the specialist doctor that you take Tramadol when you meet. This is because seizures are listed in the British National Formulary (BNF:71) as a possible side effects of taking Tramadol. By making the specialist doctor aware of this, you make sure that it is also explored as a possible cause for what has happened.  

I hear your worries about your employment. Whilst you are not able to drive, you may be able to get support from an Access to Work grant. This may be able to support you for the extra costs of staying in work such as transport costs.

I hope this information is useful for you. If you would like to talk about any of this, or if we can be of any more help, please feel free to contact us again, either by email or the Epilepsy Action Helpline freephone 0808 800 5050.

Karen
Epilepsy Action Advice & Information Team

Submitted by Karen, Epilepsy... on