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Epilepsy not a priority in NHS Long Term Plan, epilepsy organisation says

10 Jan 2019

Epilepsy organisation Epilepsy Action has said it is disappointed with the lack of priority given to epilepsy in the NHS Long Term Plan.

The Long Term Plan was published on 7 January, detailing how the NHS intends to move healthcare forward over the next 10 years.

In a post, Epilepsy Action highlighted that while epilepsy is mentioned in the plan, it is not made a priority.

Epilepsy medicines not part of government plans to let pharmacists ration medicines in case of no-deal Brexit

8 Jan 2019

The government has said epilepsy medicines will not be included in plans to allow pharmacists to ration medicines in the case of a no-deal Brexit, the Sunday Times has reported.

In December, the government set out plans to avoid shortages of medicines, which it called a “serious shortage protocol”. This would be in the event that no Brexit deal is made and the UK leaves the EU without one.

Brivaracetam accepted for use in children 4 years and older in Scotland and Wales

7 Jan 2019

The epilepsy medicine Briviact (brivaracetam) will now be available within NHS Scotland and NHS Wales for children over 4 years old for focal-onset seizures. This will be used as an add-on medicine taken alongside the person’s other medicines.

Brivaracetam is already available for use in children 4 years and older across Europe, authorised by the European Medicines Agency in July 2018.

Specialist clinicians in the UK can prescribe cannabis-based medicines to people with “exceptional clinical need”

1 Nov 2018

From today, specialist clinicians can prescribe cannabis-based medicines in the UK to patients with “exceptional clinical need”. They will no longer need to apply to an expert panel for a licence.

The UK government has rescheduled cannabis-based medicines under the Misuse of Drugs regulations 2001. They are now no longer listed under Schedule 1 alongside substances considered to have no therapeutic effect. 

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